18September2019

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The Shaving Kit - Manufacturing The Julian Assange Witch-Hunt

Last week, UK Home Secretary Sajid Javid signed the US extradition request to hand over Julian Assange, who is charged with 18 counts of violating the US Espionage Act. Assange's immediate fate now lies in the hands of the British justice system.

Javid 'consistently voted for use of UK military forces in combat operations overseas', including war on Afghanistan, Syria and the catastrophic 2011 assault on Libya. In other words, he is a key figure in precisely the US-UK Republican-Democratic-Conservative-Labour war machine exposed by WikiLeaks.

John Pilger described Assange's extradition hearing last week to The Real News Network:

'I don't think these initial extradition hearings will be fair at all, no... He's not allowed to defend himself. He's not given access to a computer so that he can access the documents and files that he needs.

'I think where it will change is if the lower court - the magistrate's court that is dealing with it now and will deal with it over the next almost nine, ten months - if they decide to extradite Julian Assange, his lawyers will appeal. And it will go up to the High Court. And I think it's there in the High Court where he may well - I say "may" - get justice. That's a cautiously optimistic view. But I think he's most likely to get it there. He certainly won't get it the United States. There's no indication of that.'

As we noted in a media alert last week, the groundwork for the persecution of Assange has been laid by a demonising state-corporate propaganda campaign. Nils Melzer, the UN special rapporteur on torture, who is also Professor of International Law at the University of Glasgow, has turned the accepted 'mainstream' view of Assange completely on its head:

'First of all, we have to realize that we have all been deliberately misled about Mr Assange. The predominant image of the shady "hacker", "sex offender" and selfish "narcissist" has been carefully constructed, disseminated and recycled in order to divert attention from the extremely powerful truths he exposed, including serious crimes and corruption on the part of multiple governments and corporations.

'By making Mr Assange "unlikeable" and ridiculous in public opinion, an environment was created in which no one would feel empathy with him, very similar to the historic witch-hunts, or to modern situations of mobbing at the workplace or in school.' (Our emphasis)

These are very significant, credible comments and, as we will discuss below, Melzer recently provided a stunning example on Twitter of how this 'carefully constructed, disseminated and recycled' image of Assange has been faked.

Melzer's revelation concerns Assange's long, dishevelled beard, which was a source of much 'mainstream' hilarity when Assange was arrested and dragged from the Ecuadorian embassy on April 11. First, let's remind ourselves of some of the grim highlights of this media coverage. In the Daily Mail, Amanda Platell wrote:

'How humiliating that as the alleged sexual predator Julian Assange emerged from Ecuador's embassy, flourishing a wild beard, Australian scientists revealed a primordial link between "flamboyant accoutrements such as beards" and titchy testicles.'

In the New Statesman, the Guardian's Suzanne Moore celebrated:

'O frabjous day! We are all bored out of our minds with Brexit when a demented looking gnome is pulled out of the Ecuadorian embassy by the secret police of the deep state. Or "the met" as normal people call them.'

In the Evening Standard, William Moore commented:

'Julian Assange... looked like a sort of mad Lord of the Rings extra as he was hauled away from the Ecuadorian embassy last week.'

Charlotte Edwardes wrote in the Evening Standard:

'Julian Assange's removal from the Ecuadorian embassy brought his straggly beard into the light. The Beard Liberation Front gets in touch to say he will not be considered for its annual shortlist of the best facial hair. "It is impossible to unequivocally state that his beard presents a positive public image," it says.' (Edwardes, 'Julian Assange's removal', Evening Standard, 12 April 2019)

David Aaronovitch of The Times tweeted:

'I see Tolstoy has just been arrested in central London.'

Like so many journalists, Derek Momodu, the Daily Mirror's Associate Picture Editor, made a joke about a bearded character from the BBC comedy series 'Only Fools And Horses':

'Unconfirmed reports that Wikileaks boss Julian Assange tried to pass as Uncle Albert to avoid arrest - but no-one was fooled.'

The Daily Star devoted an entire article to the mockery:

'Bearded Julian Assange compared to Uncle Albert as Twitter reacts to arrest

'Pamela Anderson's favourite fella has got a surprising new look.'

Embedded in the piece was a Daily Star reader survey that attracted 234 votes:

'Would you describe Julian Assange as...

'A hero [36%]

'A weirdo' [64%]

Unsurprising results, given the context and the wider political-media campaign.

The Daily Express also devoted an article to comedy takes of this kind:

'Hilarious Julian Assange memes have swept Twitter in the wake of the Wikileaks founder's arrest including one he tried to pass himself off as Uncle Albert from Only Fools and Horses - here are the best ones.'

In The Times, Ben Macintyre wrote a piece titled, 'Julian Assange belongs with crackpots and despots', observing that Assange had been 'hauled out of the Ecuadorian embassy, wearing the same beard and outraged expression as Saddam Hussein on removal from his foxhole'. The caption accompanying the photos said it all:

'Julian Assange revelled in holding court at the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Right, the Panamanian [dictator] General Manuel Noriega took refuge in the Vatican embassy in 1989'

There are clear Stalinist and Big Brother echoes when one of the most important political dissidents of our time generates this headline (subsequently edited) in the Daily Mail:

'A soaring ego. Vile personal habits. And after years in his squalid den, hardly a friend left: DOWNFALL OF A NARCISSIST'

The title of a Guardian press review also headlined completely fake, Ecuadorian government claims that Assange had smeared the walls of the embassy with his own excrement as highlighted in The Sun:

'"Whiffyleaks": what the papers say about Julian Assange's arrest'

The assumption behind all these comments, of course, was that Assange's beard was further confirmation that he was 'a definite creep, a probable rapist, a conspiracist whackjob', as 'leftist' media favourite Ash Sarkar of Novara Media tweeted. Or, as the Guardian's George Monbiot wrote in opposing Assange's extradition:

'Whether or not you like Assange's politics (I don't), or his character (ditto)...'

As discussed, Nils Melzer argues that Assange has become '"unlikeable" and ridiculous in public opinion', not because of who he is, but because of a state-sponsored propaganda campaign - the journalists listed above are either complicit or dupes. This media charade was exposed with great clarity by Melzer's revelation on Twitter:

'How public humiliation works: On 11 April, Julian Assange was mocked for his beard throughout the world. During my visit, he explained to us that his shaving kit had been deliberately taken away three months earlier.'

It had simply never occurred to the great herd of journalists - which understood that Assange was someone to be smeared, mocked and abused – that his appearance might have something to do with Ecuador's brutal treatment cutting off his communications, his visitors and even his medical care. Fidel Narvaez, former consul at the Ecuadorian embassy from the first day Assange arrived, on 19 June 2012, until 15 July 2018, said the Ecuadorian regime under president Lenin Moreno had tried to make life 'unbearable' for Assange.

As part of a Swedish project in support of Assange, a message containing an offer from Melzer to be interviewed was emailed to around 500 individuals, primarily Swedish journalists. Recipients were able to reply with a single click on an embedded link in the message. Not a single journalist did so. In an email copied to Media Lens, Melzer commented:

'My impression is that, after my initial press release, most of the mainstream media have gone into something like a shock paralysis leaving them unable to process the enormous contradiction between their own misguided portraits of Assange and the terrifying truth of what has been going on in reality. The problem, of course, is that mainstream media bear a significant share of the responsibility for enabling this disgraceful witch-hunt and now have to muster up the strength to face their tragic failure to objectively inform and empower the people in this case.

'One of my own nationalities being Swedish, I am quite familiar with what a certain obsession with political correctness can do to one's capacity for critical thinking. But the fact that, of more than 500 solicited Swedish journalists, not a single one was interested in an in-depth interview with a Swiss-Swedish UN expert publicly accusing Sweden of judicial persecution and psychological torture, speaks to a level of denial and self-censorship that can hardly be reconciled with objective and informative reporting.' (Melzer, email, 13 June 2019)

It is indeed a dramatic example of denial and self-censorship. But alas, there is no 'shock paralysis', for corporate media have been treating the best-informed, most courageous and most honest truth-tellers this way for years and decades.

When Denis Halliday, the UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, resigned in protest in September 1998, describing the UN sanctions regime he had set up and run as 'genocidal', his comments were mentioned in passing then forgotten. The same treatment was afforded his successor as UN Humanitarian Coordinator, Hans von Sponeck, who resigned in protest at the sanctions in February 2000. Since its publication in 2006, von Sponeck's forensic, deeply rational and deeply damning account of his experiences, 'A Different Kind Of War – The UN Sanctions Regime In Iraq' (Berghahn Books, 2006), has been mentioned once across the entire US-UK press, in a single paragraph of 139 words in an article by Robert Fisk in the Independent, and never reviewed. (Fisk, 'Fear climate change, not our enemies', The Independent, 20 Jan 2007)

At a time of maximum global media coverage of Iraq, Halliday was mentioned in 2 of the 12,366 Guardian and Observer articles mentioning Iraq in 2003; von Sponeck was mentioned 5 times. Halliday was mentioned in 2 of the 8,827 articles mentioning Iraq in 2004; von Sponeck was mentioned 5 times.

In 2002, Scott Ritter, former UN chief weapons inspector in Iraq from 1991-1998 declared that Iraq had been 'fundamentally disarmed' of 90-95% of its weapons of mass destruction by December 1998, signifying that the case for war was an audacious fraud. (Ritter and William Rivers Pitt, 'War On Iraq', Profile Books, 2002, p.23) In the 12,366 articles mentioning Iraq in 2003, the Guardian and Observer mentioned Ritter a total of 17 times.

In February, we described how Alfred de Zayas, the first UN rapporteur to visit Venezuela for 21 years, had commented that US sanctions were illegal and could amount to 'crimes against humanity' under international law. Our ProQuest UK media database search for the last six months for corporate newspaper articles containing:

'de Zayas' and 'Venezuela' = 2 hits

One of these, bitterly critical, in The Times, was titled:

'Radical Chic - The UN's system of human rights reporting is a politicised travesty'

There have been a couple of other mentions in the Independent online, but, once again, we find ourselves reaching for the same comment from Noam Chomsky that sums it up so well:

'The basic principle, rarely violated, is that what conflicts with the requirements of power and privilege does not exist.' (Chomsky, 'Deterring Democracy', Hill and Wang, 1992, p.79)

DE

  • Written by Editor

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